Worldwide Baseball League – Top 20 Prospects

For the next installments of “What If Major League Baseball Wasn’t The Highest League?”, I’m going to be releasing the official PSF Top 100 Prospect List. Read the introduction here: WWBL introduction article

The PSF prospect experts value the following things: age, MLB experience, tools (power, contact, speed, defense velocity, stuff, etc), and MLB success. All of those are taken into account in our ratings. All players must have at least half of a season of MLB experience to be on this list, meaning no actual prospects will be featured. Salaries are not taken into account. The top 100 prospects represent the top 100 players who we believe will not only have the most success in the WWBL, but also the players who will be able to have value the longest. That is one of the reasons why older players may not make this list. Like prospects, Future Value is considered. One bad year does not ruin a prospect’s rank, and MLB success is not the only thing taken into account.

Again, these are not necessarily the top 100 players in baseball right now. Stats from the last three seasons are taken into account.

 

20. Paul Goldschmidt (African Alligators of Ethiopia, NL Arizona)

19. Cody Bellinger (Los Angeles Leopards, NL Los Angeles)

18. Gary Sanchez (New York City Ninjas, AL New York)

17. Kevin Kiermaier (Seoul Snakes, AL Tampa Bay)

16. Michael Conforto (New York City Ninjas, NL New York)

15. Noah Syndergaard (New York City Ninjas, NL New York)

14. Anthony Rendon (Moscow Meerkats, NL Washington)

13. Max Scherzer (Moscow Meerkats, NL Washington)

12. Kris Bryant (Tokyo Tigers, NL Chicago)

11. Nolan Arenado (Colombia Cats, NL Colorado)

10. Jose Altuve (Mexico City Monsters, AL Houston)

9. Carlos Correa (Mexico City Monsters, AL Houston)

8. Francisco Lindor (Tokyo Tigers, AL Cleveland)

7. Manny Machado (African Alligators of Ethiopia, AL Baltimore)

6. Clayton Kershaw (Los Angeles Leopards, NL Los Angeles)

For the top 5, scouting grades are listed. The scale is from 20-80, where 50 is average, and every 10 pts above or below is one standard deviation better or worse.

5. Bryce Harper (Moscow Meerkats, NL Washington)

— Contact: 45 / Power: 70 / Baserunning: 55 / Defense: 55 / Eye: 60 / Positional Value: 40 / Age: 65

4. Chris Sale (New York City Ninjas, AL Boston)

— Strikeout: 65 / Walk: 65 / Home Run prev: 55 / Run prev: 60 / Velocity: 55 / Innings: 80 / Age: 55

3. Mookie Betts (New York City Ninjas, AL Boston)

— Contact: 65 / Power: 55 / Baserunning: 70 / Defense: 70 / Eye: 50 / Positional Value: 45 / Age: 65

2. Corey Seager (Los Angeles Leopards, NL Los Angeles)
— Contact: 50 / Power: 60 / Baserunning: 55 / Defense: 60 / Eye: 60 / Positional Value: 60 / Age: 70

And your number one Worldwide Baseball League prospect is…

 

Mike Trout (Los Angeles Leopards, AL Los Angeles/Anaheim)

— Contact: 55 / Power: 70 / Baserunning: 65/ Defense: 50 / Eye: 60 / Positional Value: 50 / Age: 65

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Worldwide Baseball League – Prospects #21-40

For the next installments of “What If Major League Baseball Wasn’t The Highest League?”, I’m going to be releasing the official PSF Top 100 Prospect List. Read the introduction here: WWBL introduction article

The PSF prospect experts value the following things: age, MLB experience, tools (power, contact, speed, defense velocity, stuff, etc), and MLB success. All of those are taken into account in our ratings. All players must have at least half of a season of MLB experience to be on this list, meaning no actual prospects will be featured. Salaries are not taken into account. The top 100 prospects represent the top 100 players who we believe will not only have the most success in the WWBL, but also the players who will be able to have value the longest. That is one of the reasons why older players may not make this list. Like prospects, Future Value is considered. One bad year does not ruin a prospect’s rank, and MLB success is not the only thing taken into account.

Again, these are not necessarily the top 100 players in baseball right now. Stats from the last three seasons are taken into account.

 

40. Johnny Cueto (Seoul Snakes, NL San Francisco)

39. Xander Bogaerts (New York City Ninjas, AL Boston)

38. Addison Russell (Tokyo Tigers, NL Chicago)

37. Charlie Blackmon (Colombia Cats, NL Colorado)

36. Joey Votto (Colombia Cats, NL Cincinnati)

35. Anthony Rizzo (Tokyo Tigers, NL Chicago)

34. Trea Turner (Moscow Meerkats, NL Washington)

33. Kenley Jansen (Los Angeles Leopards, NL Los Angeles)

32. AJ Pollock (African Alligators of Ethiopia, NL Arizona)

31. Stephen Strasburg (Moscow Meerkats, NL Washington)

30. Gerrit Cole (Shanghai Shockers, NL Pittsburgh)

29. Justin Turner (Los Angeles Leopards, NL Los Angeles)

28. Aaron Judge (New York City Ninjas, AL New York)

27. Jose Ramirez (Tokyo Tigers, AL Cleveland)

26. Freddie Freeman (Shanghai Shockers, NL Atlanta)

25. Madison Bumgarner (Seoul Snakes, NL San Francisco)

24. Carlos Martinez (London Leopards, NL St Louis)

23. Corey Kluber (Tokyo Tigers, AL Cleveland)

22. Josh Donaldson (Moscow Meerkats, AL Toronto)

21. Chris Archer (Seoul Snakes, AL Tampa Bay)

Worldwide Baseball League – Prospects #41-60

For the next installments of “What If Major League Baseball Wasn’t The Highest League?”, I’m going to be releasing the official PSF Top 100 Prospect List. Read the introduction here: WWBL introduction article

The PSF prospect experts value the following things: age, MLB experience, tools (power, contact, speed, defense velocity, stuff, etc), and MLB success. All of those are taken into account in our ratings. All players must have at least half of a season of MLB experience to be on this list, meaning no actual prospects will be featured. Salaries are not taken into account. The top 100 prospects represent the top 100 players who we believe will not only have the most success in the WWBL, but also the players who will be able to have value the longest. That is one of the reasons why older players may not make this list. Like prospects, Future Value is considered. One bad year does not ruin a prospect’s rank, and MLB success is not the only thing taken into account.

Again, these are not necessarily the top 100 players in baseball right now. Stats from the last three seasons are taken into account.

 

60. Danny Duffy (Colombia Cats, AL Kansas City)

59. Robbie Ray (African Alligators of Ethiopia, NL Arizona)

58. Kyle Hendricks (Tokyo Tigers, NL Chicago)

57. JT Realmuto (Seoul Snakes, NL Miami)

56. Carlos Carrasco (Tokyo Tigers, AL Cleveland)

55. Masahiro Tanaka (New York City Ninjas, AL New York)

54. Dallas Keuchel (Mexico City Monsters, AL Houston)

53. Andrelton Simmons (Los Angeles Leopards, AL Los Angeles/Anaheim)

52. Jason Heyward (Tokyo Tigers, NL Chicago)

51. Adam Eaton (Moscow Meerkats, NL Washington)

50. Lance McCullers (Mexico City Monsters, AL Houston)

49. Daniel Murphy (Moscow Meerkats, NL Washington)

48. Julio Teheran (Shanghai Shockers, NL Atlanta)

47. David Price (New York City Ninjas, AL Boston)

46. Zack Greinke (African Alligators of Ethiopia, NL Arizona)

45. Ender Inciarte (Shanghai Shockers, NL Atlanta)

44. Buster Posey (Seoul Snakes, NL San Francisco)

43. Jon Lester (Tokyo Tigers, NL Chicago)

42. Jose Quintana (Tokyo Tigers, NL Chicago)

41. George Springer (Mexico City Monsters, AL Houston)

 

Worldwide Baseball League – Prospects #61-80

For the next installments of “What If Major League Baseball Wasn’t The Highest League?”, I’m going to be releasing the official PSF Top 100 Prospect List. Read the introduction here: WWBL introduction article

The PSF prospect experts value the following things: age, MLB experience, tools (power, contact, speed, defense velocity, stuff, etc), and MLB success. All of those are taken into account in our ratings. All players must have at least half of a season of MLB experience to be on this list, meaning no actual prospects will be featured. Salaries are not taken into account. The top 100 prospects represent the top 100 players who we believe will not only have the most success in the WWBL, but also the players who will be able to have value the longest. That is one of the reasons why older players may not make this list. Like prospects, Future Value is considered. One bad year does not ruin a prospect’s rank, and MLB success is not the only thing taken into account.

Again, these are not necessarily the top 100 players in baseball right now. Stats from the last three seasons are taken into account.

80. Kevin Pillar (Moscow Meerkats, AL Toronto)

79. Jake Arrieta (Tokyo Tigers, NL Chicago)

78. Ian Kinsler (Tokyo Tigers, AL Detroit)

77. Kyle Seager (Moscow Meerkats, AL Seattle)

76. Brian Dozier (African Alligators of Ethiopia, AL Minnesota)

75. Zach Britton (African Alligators of Ethiopia, AL Baltimore)

74. Aroldis Chapman (New York City Ninjas, AL New York)

73. Craig Kimbrel (New York City Ninjas, AL Boston)

72. Chris Devenski (Mexico City Monsters, AL Houston)

71. Ken Giles (Mexico City Monsters, AL Houston)

70. Andrew Benintendi (New York City Ninjas, AL Boston)

69. Roberto Osuna (Moscow Meerkats, AL Toronto)

68. Andrew Miller (Tokyo Tigers, AL Cleveland)

67. Trevor Story (Colombia Cats, NL Colorado)

66. Michael Fulmer (Tokyo Tigers, AL Detroit)

65. Travis Shaw (London Lizards, NL Milwaukee)

64. Zack Cozart (Colombia Cats, NL Cincinnati)

63. Mike Moustakas (Colombia Cats, AL Kansas City)

62. Taijuan Walker (African Alligators of Ethiopia, NL Arizona)

61. Jackie Bradley Jr (New York City Ninjas, AL Boston)

Worldwide Baseball League – Prospects #81-100

For the next installments of “What If Major League Baseball Wasn’t The Highest League?”, I’m going to be releasing the official PSF Top 100 Prospect List. Read the introduction here: WWBL introduction article

The PSF prospect experts value the following things: age, MLB experience, tools (power, contact, speed, defense velocity, stuff, etc), and MLB success. All of those are taken into account in our ratings. All players must have at least half of a season of MLB experience to be on this list, meaning no actual prospects will be featured. Salaries are not taken into account. The top 100 prospects represent the top 100 players who we believe will not only have the most success in the WWBL, but also the players who will be able to have value the longest. That is one of the reasons why older players may not make this list. Like prospects, Future Value is considered. One bad year does not ruin a prospect’s rank, and MLB success is not the only thing taken into account.

Again, these are not necessarily the top 100 players in baseball right now. Stats from the last three seasons are taken into account.

100. Justin Verlander (Tokyo Tigers, AL Detroit)

99. Marcus Stroman (Moscow Meerkats, AL Toronto)

98. Jake Lamb (African Alligators of Ethiopia, NL Arizona)

97. Jake Odorizzi (Seoul Snakes, AL Tampa Bay)

96. Yoenis Cespedes (New York City Ninjas, NL New York)

95. Jacob deGrom (New York City Ninjas, NL New York)

94. Lorenzo Cain (Colombia Cats, AL Kansas City)

93. Cole Hamels (Mexico City Meerkats, AL Texas)

92. Jimmy Nelson (London Lizards, NL Milwaukee)

91. Giancarlo Stanton (Seoul Snakes, NL Miami)

90. Gio Gonzalez (Moscow Meerkats, NL Washington)

89. Didi Gregorius (New York City Ninjas, AL New York)

88. Mike Leake (London Lizards, NL St Louis)

87. Willson Contreras (Tokyo Tigers, NL Chicago)

86. Rougned Odor (Mexico City Monsters, AL Texas)

85. Brandon Crawford (Seoul Snakes, NL San Francisco)

84. Dexter Fowler (London Lizards, NL St Louis)

83. Odubel Herrera (London Lizards, NL Philadelphia)

82. Chrisian Yelich (Seoul Snakes, NL Miami)

81. Rick Porcello (New York City Ninjas, AL Boston)

The next 20 prospects will be up tomorrow (7/31)

What If Major League Baseball Wasn’t The Highest Level?

Prospects get a ton of hype, and for good reason. They give fans a reason to be excited about the future of their favorite organization. Problem is, despite loads of sites dedicated to scouting and ranking prospects, the casual fans don’t know much about them. How many casual Nationals fans watch AAA Syracuse on a regular basis? Not many of them. So yeah, maybe you’ll know your team’s prospects names, when they were drafted, etc, but that’s probably it. It’s hard to argue the case for your favorite minor leaguers to be ranked a certain way when it’s simply impossible to watch every prospect play. Should Yoan Moncada be the top prospect? Most experts agree so, but how would you be able to argue his case without watching other top prospects on a regular basis?

That’s why I’m going to start this series, which should be super fun to write and hopefully more fun for you to read. It revolves around one question and one question only: “What if Major League Baseball wasn’t the highest level of professional baseball?” So, for example, the Chicago Cubs and Washington Nationals are just minor league teams with promising talents for the higher up league: the Worldwide Baseball League (WWBL). Also I know that Worldwide is one word but the official acronym is WWBL. Simply put, baseball wanted to expand throughout the world, so they just added another league with super athletes, none of whom came from MLB. Please don’t be mad about the lack of details I’m providing.

There are ten teams in the WWBL, each team has three MLB affiliates:

Tokyo Tigers (Chicago Cubs, Detroit Tigers, Cleveland Indians)

Shanghai Shockers (Pittsburgh Pirates, Atlanta Braves, Chicago White Sox)

Mexico City Monsters (Texas Rangers, Houston Astros, San Diego Padres)

New York City Ninjas (New York Mets, New York Yankees, Boston Red Sox)

African Alligators of Ethiopia (Minnesota Twins, Baltimore Orioles, Arizona Diamondbacks)

Seoul Snakes (Tampa Bay Rays, Miami Marlins, San Francisco Giants)

Los Angeles Leopards (Los Angeles Dodgers, Los Angeles Angels, Oakland Athletics)

Moscow Meerkats (Seattle Mariners, Washington Nationals, Toronto Blue Jays)

Colombia Cats (Colorado Rockies, Kansas City Royals, Cincinnati Reds)

London Lizards (Philadelphia Phillies, Milwaukee Brewers, St Louis Cardinals)

 

From here going forward, each MLB team will be referred to the same way current MiLB teams are (NL Dodgers, AL Blue Jays, etc).

The people at PSF will be submitting their list of top prospects in MLB (taking into account skill, tools, potential and age, BUT NOT CONTRACTS).

Hope you guys enjoy this series!

The Next Four Home Run Hitter

On Tuesday, we saw something that had only been done by a select few throughout baseball history. Someone hit four home runs in one game. And of course, his name is Scooter Gennett.

Gennett put up one of the best offensive games in the history of the sport: 5 for 5, 4 HR, 10 RBI, 17 total bases. Again, not Mike Trout, nor Bryce Harper, nor Aaron Judge… Scooter Gennett!

My question is, who will be the next player to hit four homers in one game?

To hit four home runs in one game, a player generally has little to no breathing room. Yes, Gennett had five shots at four homers, which is still tough, but some only have four chances. After all, Gennett barely got to bat for a fifth time. So if you want to do it, you need to hit fly balls, while not striking out or walking.

For example, Aaron Judge is known as a slugger, for good reason. But I don’t think he has a chance at four home runs in one game. His strikeout and walk rates are so high that it would be hard enough for him to put the ball in play four times. Most sluggers are like this, a ton of walks and strikeouts lead to fewer opportunities.

I decided to look at who put the ball in the air the most, but not per batted ball, per plate appearance. This could help eliminate high strikeout/walk guys.

Here are the top 10 qualified players in (FB+LD)/PA in 2017:

  1. Salvador Perez
  2. Josh Reddick
  3. Daniel Murphy
  4. Mike Moustakas
  5. Jed Lowrie
  6. Jorge Polanco
  7. Nolan Arenado
  8. Ian Kinsler
  9. Jose Ramirez
  10. Kyle Seager

Of these players, let’s take a look at their HR/FB% to get a feel for how often the balls they put in the air go over the fence. This is important to look at because guys who hit bloop fly balls probably shouldn’t be considered.

Here are the top three:

  1. Mike Moustakas (20.0%)
  2. Nolan Arenado (14.7%)
  3. Daniel Murphy (13.9%)

So, if I’m betting on this (not recommended), I’m putting my money on one of those three guys. Nolan Arenado stands out during home games, but these are probably the guys with the best chances.

Then again, if Scooter Gennett can do it, then who knows?

Mike Trout Is Out For Awhile, Sadly

If you somehow missed the news, I hate to be the one to break it to you: Mike Trout will be getting surgery to repair a UCL tear in his left thumb. He is on the disabled list for the first time in his historic career, and is expected to be out at least six weeks. How much are the Angels going to miss with Trout gone?

Hint: it’s a lot.


From 2012-2016, Trout put up an insane 47.1 fWAR. That’s the 30th best five year stretch in baseball history. Keep in mind, IT WAS TROUT’S FIRST FIVE FULL SEASONS.

Let’s look at the rest of the players to put up 47.1 WAR in a five season stretch (some players have done it multiple times):

  1. Babe Ruth (best stretch: 61.2 WAR)
  2. Barry Bonds (best stretch: 54.9 WAR)
  3. Ted Williams (best stretch: 53.4 WAR)
  4. Rogers Hornsby (best stretch: 52.2 WAR)
  5. Honus Wagner (best stretch: 51.1 WAR)
  6. Willie Mays (best stretch: 50.0 WAR)
  7. Lou Gehrig (best stretch: 48.3 WAR)
  8. Mickey Mantle (best stretch: 48.2 WAR)
  9. Ty Cobb (best stretch: 47.3 WAR)
  10. Joe Morgan (best stretch: 47.3 WAR)

Trout has already established himself as a Hall of Famer, he just needs to play for 10 seasons until he’s a lock. Only ten other players have put up a stretch comparable to Trout’s, regardless of age and experience, and nine of them are in the Hall of Fame (sorry, Barry).


It’s not a surprise that Trout draws comparisons to some of the greatest outfielders of all time. After all, he’s on a legendary track (see image below, from Fangraphs):

chart(3)

Yup, that’s Mike Trout in blue. At age 25, Mantle was the only one near him, and that’s if Trout doesn’t play another game this season. These guys are legends, and are having trouble keeping up with Trout.


The Angels are screwed without Mike Trout, but how screwed are they?

If you remove Mike Trout’s numbers from the Angels’ team totals, the team has a slash line of .226/.297/.344. That’s… awful.

For comparison, this year’s Padres are slashing a combined .221/.288/.367. The Angels are on par with the Padres without Mike Trout.

Sorry Angels fans, and also fans of greatness in the making, but we may have to wait awhile for a living Hall of Famer to come back.


PS: check out @ZRoriginal on Twitter if you like the featured image.